Logic music program for mac

This latter mode will certainly be welcomed by anyone who's ever had to mess around with V-Drum mapping. So, for those who really want to have full control over the drum sound, Apple have also included so-called Producer Kit versions, where each drum in the kit has its own dedicated output. Switching between standard and Producer kits is easy: Now simply select the appropriate kit notice that the names are prefixed with the plus sign and you're ready to go.

What's really great about the multi-channel kits is that they make use of the Track Stacks feature. And what's useful about this is that the Producer Kits come pre-loaded with the tracks for all the necessary splits, meaning that you don't have to worry about setting this up yourself. Simply open the Stack and you'll see Channel Strips for all the drums with the current mix, where an engineer has already set up initial levels, pans and various EQs and compressors for you.

Leak sets whether the sound of that drum is heard in the mics for other drums in the kit, Overheads sets whether the drum is heard in the overhead microphone, and Room lets you toggle the room emulations, as well as choosing between one of two rooms. One of the things I've always liked about Logic is the way in which Logic's instrument plug-ins tended not to have built-in effects. Alternatively, you can enable the Learn button, open the plug-in, click the parameter you want to control, and then disable the Learn button.

Simply click the first mapping entry and choose Add Mapping from the pop-up menu, and another mapping will be added, compete with its own independent settings. Smart Controls can also be useful when used in conjunction with Summing Stacks, because while each sub-track can have its own Smart Controls layout, so can the main track, with the ability to access all the parameters of all the sub-tracks. For example, some layouts contain switches and some don't, and some layouts contain more controls than you might need, and some too few.

Setting it up is easy: After that, both Logic and Logic Remote will remember this marriage, and re-establish it automatically whenever both sides are available. You can use the ruler to scrub time, and if Cycle Mode is active, you can even adjust the Cycle Region. The Mixer view works pretty much as you might expect. In the upper part of each Channel Strip, there are four buttons for setting the automation mode, record enable if available for that track , and mute and solo.

The Settings button on the Control bar provides access to some useful commands, such as undo and redo, as well as commands for creating new tracks. Once you've done that, the new track gets selected and you can tap the Control bar's Library button to access the library of available instrument patches and pick one to assign to that track.

Logic Remote makes it easier to set up and access key commands Logic Remote's Key Commands view makes it possible to trigger key commands from your iPad. Here you can see the configuration pop-out that makes it possible to assign your own key commands and colours.

To reconfigure an existing key command, change its colour, or remove it, tap with two fingers on the key command to reopen the pop-up. Adding just one extra row, to have 24 plus six commands visible at once, wouldn't make the buttons that much smaller. And wouldn't it be nice if the six key commands along the bottom could be optionally persistent across multiple views, much like the way the Control bar is always visible along the top?

Smart Help. There is no doubt that Apple have developed some very sophisticated features in Logic Pro X.

Recording and Virtual Instruments

But many of the big new features appeal to very different sets of users. Such features demonstrate how Apple are trying to broaden Logic Pro's appeal beyond the sort of people who used Logic prior to Apple's acquisition of Emagic 11 years ago. And while that's completely understandable, it means, perhaps inevitably, that certain areas of the program, and certain lingering requests from long-time users, are still arguably not getting the attention they warrant. For example, the only real improvements made to the Piano Roll editor in this release have been to bring GarageBand-style editing techniques to the Inspector.

And certainly, if you compare Logic Pro's Piano Roll editor with, say, Cubase's Key Editor, there's an increasing gap in functionality between the two. Furthermore, the measures that Apple have taken to simplify the program mean that certain ways of working with previous versions now seem to be impossible. If users have to wait so long between updates while observing the movements of competing products, it will always be hard for Apple to meet expectations.

The user interface changes in Logic Pro X see some attention paid to the mixer controls.

SOUND ON SOUND

Instead, the volume is shown in its own display above the fader, next to an easier-to-read peak level display. Alternatively, you can drag the first plug-in into this area, as before, to move it into the second slot. Following on from Logic Pro 9's Flex Time, which allowed you to correct the timing of recorded audio, Logic Pro X introduces Flex Pitch to let you correct or otherwise adjust the pitch of recorded audio. To edit the pitch of an Audio Region, you double-click it to open it in the new Audio Track editor.

You can change the pitch and timing of the notes in pretty much the same way as you would in the Piano Roll editor, including being able to split and merge notes.

Logic Pro X - Video Tutorial 01 - Getting Starting in Logic X

Above the note are three hotspots for dealing with pitch: What's nice about the handles is that they update the display in the editor as you drag, making it easy to see what you're doing. Below the note are three additional handles for controlling the gain, the amount of vibrato, and the formant shift of the note. Of course, Flex Time isn't necessarily about pitch correction. Logic Pro's instrument and effects plug-ins have always been affectionately regarded, even though the cobwebs from the Emagic days have become more apparent in the last few versions.

Logic Remote. Multi-Touch mixing. Pair and play. Acoustic Drums Electronic Beats. Alternative Rock. Tech House.

Logic Pro X - 9to5Mac

Industry-leading tools. Track Alternatives Create alternate versions of a track or multiple grouped tracks, and switch between them at any time to audition different options. Track Stacks Consolidate multiple related tracks into a single track.

Automation Easily capture changes to any channel strip or plug-in parameter. Exporting Share projects and tracks with AirDrop, Mail Drop, or a comprehensive set of features for exporting stems. Graduate from GarageBand. Logic Remote for iOS. Music Memos Capture your song ideas. Education Bundle Five amazing apps. To the left, a track inspector window shows the mixer channel strip for the individual track, plus the track's output bus—be it the master stereo or 5.

The right side pops up a number of windows that cover the tempo and time signature of your project, as well as the current MIDI track's event list, which when combined with the piano roll or score editor, makes it simple to edit your tracks. The score editor still isn't quite as capable as Finale, but it certainly does the job for songwriters or orchestral arranging in a pinch. Logic Pro Tap on a knob, and you can slide a fader right or left to change its value, which makes sense given the thinness of the Touch Bar; you wouldn't want to try and actually tweak a knob that small in a circular manner.

In addition, the Touch Bar supports hundreds of keyboard shortcuts, including customized sets, and you can use the Touch Bar to perform with small drum pads, piano keyboard scales, or even map MIDI continuous controllers to a slider for third-party plug-ins that use the mod wheel for expression, like Garritan Personal Orchestra or Spectrasonics Omnisphere. The Touch Bar, along with Logic Remote on an iPad, further reduces the need for an expensive hardware transport and mixing controller that also takes up space on your desk. For years, Logic has delivered a seamless environment for recording live audio tracks, and that continues with the latest version.

As before, you can record audio at up to bit, kHz resolution. The big news in This lets you create a project around a specific feel, and allows for things like a drummer rushing a tiny bit in the choruses for more energy. It means you can stick everything on successive tracks to a grid without a metronomic feel. Smart Tempo is a little fiddly to get it working; you have to set the project to keep or adapt tempo, and then also set how recordings and import behave. But it worked well in testing; my wife clapped in a syncopated rhythm in Adapt mode, and Logic perfectly mapped out the grid lines and tempo map measure by measure.

I was then able to adjust the tempo up and down in individual measures simply by grabbing the line and moving the mouse, which was similar to how Logic's regular automation lanes work. I then imported in some clav loops and watched as Logic Pro adjusted the rhythms to follow the tempo map from the clapping exactly.


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This is a serious boon for live recordings of bands or singer-songwriters that want to get ideas down quickly and then also use them to form the basis of the final project, as opposed to having to do it all again later to a metronome. Apple amped up Logic Pro X's built-in sound set considerably in Heading up the list of additions are Studio Strings and Studio Horns, both of which offer fine control of individual players and sound excellent in a mix context. Apple has created a new articulation system for legato, staccato, bowing, pizz, and other kinds of playing that not only works here, but also with third-party virtual instruments from Native Instruments, EastWest, and more.

The new strings and horns sound authentic, crisp, and clear, if more on the immediate close-miked side than in capturing any room ambience the way EastWest libraries work. So you'll need to add a reverb from within Logic. Apple offers a guide to the articulations that lets you set up keyswitches on an key keyboard, and you can also manage the articulations for different instruments and third-party libraries ; there are separate ones for the horns as well.

That said, even with all of this done for you and some nice patches set up in the Library, it's going to sound like "General MIDI " unless you take full advantage of the articulations and program the tracks in the right ranges. That's obviously true for third-party libraries too, although some offer more immediate gratification than others. Studio Strings and Studio Horns are on the "spend some time with it to get it sounding natural" side. That said, they're free with Logic, and hopefully Apple will eventually flesh out the rest of the orchestra with articulations for woodwinds, brass, and percussion.

The star of the show remains Alchemy, a full-blown additive, spectral, and granular synthesizer originally from Camel Audio. I had been meaning to buy a copy of that synth for years to begin with; it used to cost several hundred dollars. Apple redesigned the interface, reworked the filters for a fatter analog-type sound, and added support for importing EXS24 instruments; in A separate vintage keyboard and organ collection includes such niceties as B3-style drawbars, a vastly configurable Leslie simulator, and a suitcase-style electric piano, along with a new-for There are also plenty of guitar and bass amp simulators and effects included as well.

EXS24 continues to be the workhorse sampler it has been for over a decade, and provides the core workstation-style sample set, including drum kits and pianos. Logic's venerable E-series plug-ins such as ES1, ES2, ES P, the EVP88 electric piano and so on provide plenty of synthesizer and keyboard sounds, although many of these sound a bit thin when stacked against today's top plug-ins. That doesn't matter, because you also get Retro Synth, which provides fat-sounding imitations of subtractive, FM, and wavetable-based based vintage synths, and you can even drag any waveform into the wavetable module; the plug-in will automatically look for pitched information and transform it into a playable virtual instrument.

I've always been a fan of third-party drum plug-ins like Superior Drummer and EZdrummer, but it's tough to argue with the one built into Logic Pro X. Drummer is an artificially intelligent session player—one of 30, each with different styles, personalities, and drum kits for a distinctive groove. You can adjust the frequency of fills, whether they're using the toms or hi-hats more in a given section, and even the frequency of ghost notes and whether they're rushing the beat a la Stewart Copeland or relaxing the groove a la John Bonham.

Drummer can follow other tracks for inspiration; for example, the bass player can set the groove for a performance, and Drummer will take cues from the bass track to figure out where to lock in the kick drum.

Logic Pro X

You don't have to use Drummer for auto-generated grooves, though; if you're like me, you'll want to program your own grooves. And for that, it sounds great. The Producer Kits include excellent-sounding, multi-channel mixes done by legendary engineer Bob Clearmountain—complete with EQ, compression, and additional processing and routing—and you can see all of the settings to learn what he did with the stock Logic plug-ins.

Drummer can also do electronic music; you can dial up any number of styles and kits, from house and retro to hip hop and electro pop.