Antivirus pour mac os x mavericks

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Business Solutions. Business Security Services. Buy Pro Premium security. Your Mac is not immune to threats — yet. Our free Mac antivirus protects on 3 fronts. See all anti-malware features. Browse and email all day. See all online security features. Need premium Mac antivirus protection? Say hello to Avast Security Pro. Stop ransomware cold Avast Security Pro walls off your photos and files from ransomware attack to ensure that none of your most personal memories can be encrypted — or changed in any way — without your permission.

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The best free antivirus platforms for Mac in 12222

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This site uses cookies - We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings , otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Need a version of Malwarebytes for Mac OS Recommended Posts. Posted September 30, Thanks so much. Share this post Link to post Share on other sites. Posted September 30, edited. Hello, i am not firn this a Mac.

Is this the right thing you are looking for? Sorry, but I'm not sure what works with Java is, among other things, a platform for running complex applications in a web page, on the client. That was always a bad idea, and Java's developers have proven themselves incapable of implementing it without also creating a portal for malware to enter. Past Java exploits are the closest thing there has ever been to a Windows-style virus affecting OS X.

Merely loading a page with malicious Java content could be harmful. Fortunately, client-side Java on the Web is obsolete and mostly extinct. Only a few outmoded sites still use it.

Best anti-virus for mavericks?

Try to hasten the process of extinction by avoiding those sites, if you have a choice. Forget about playing games or other non-essential uses of Java. Java is not included in OS X Discrete Java installers are distributed by Apple and by Oracle the developer of Java. Don't use either one unless you need it.

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Most people don't. If Java is installed, disable it — not JavaScript —in your browsers. Regardless of version, experience has shown that Java on the Web can't be trusted. If you must use a Java applet for a task on a specific site, enable Java only for that site in Safari. Never enable Java for a public website that carries third-party advertising. Use it only on well-known, login-protected, secure websites without ads. In Safari 6 or later, you'll see a lock icon in the address bar with the abbreviation "https" when visiting a secure site. The rest of this comment concerns what you should not do to protect yourself.

Never install any commercial "anti-virus" AV or "Internet security" products for the Mac, as they are all worse than useless.

If you need to be able to detect Windows malware in your files, use one of the free security apps in the Mac App Store—nothing else. This technique is a proven failure , as a major AV software vendor has admitted. Most attacks are "zero-day"—that is, previously unknown.

Antivirus for Mac OS X Maverick - Apple Community

Recognition-based AV does not defend against such attacks , and the enterprise IT industry is coming to the realization that traditional AV software is worthless. Malware is downloaded from the network; it doesn't materialize from nowhere. In order to meet that nonexistent threat, commercial AV software modifies or duplicates low-level functions of the operating system, which is a waste of resources and a common cause of instability, bugs, and poor performance.

An AV product from the App Store, such as "ClamXav," has the same drawback as the commercial suites of being always out of date, but it does not inject low-level code into the operating system. That doesn't mean it's entirely harmless. It may report email messages that have "phishing" links in the body, or Windows malware in attachments, as infected files, and offer to delete or move them. Doing so will corrupt the Mail database. The messages should be deleted from within the Mail application. It's useful, if at all, only for detecting Windows malware, and even for that use it's not really effective, because new Windows malware is emerging much faster than OS X malware.

Windows malware can't harm you directly unless, of course, you use Windows. Just don't pass it on to anyone else. A malicious attachment in email is usually easy to recognize by the name alone. An actual example:. You don't need software to tell you that's a Windows trojan. Software may be able to tell you which trojan it is, but who cares? In practice, there's no reason to use recognition software unless an organizational policy requires it. Windows malware is so widespread that you should assume it's in every email attachment until proven otherwise.

Nevertheless, ClamXav or a similar product from the App Store may serve a purpose if it satisfies an ill-informed network administrator who says you must run some kind of AV application.

It's free and it won't handicap the system. The ClamXav developer won't try to "upsell" you to a paid version of the product. Other developers may do that. Don't be upsold. For one thing, you should not pay to protect Windows users from the consequences of their choice of computing platform. For another, a paid upgrade from a free app will probably have all the disadvantages mentioned in section 7.

It seems to be a common belief that the built-in Application Firewall acts as a barrier to infection, or prevents malware from functioning. It does neither. It blocks inbound connections to certain network services you're running, such as file sharing. It's disabled by default and you should leave it that way if you're behind a router on a private home or office network.

Activate it only when you're on an untrusted network, for instance a public Wi-Fi hotspot, where you don't want to provide services. Disable any services you don't use in the Sharing preference pane. All are disabled by default. As a Mac user, you don't have to live in fear that your computer may be infected every time you install software, read email, or visit a web page.